Schedule

January 14: Introductions

overview of class syllabus and projects: what is multimodal composition and born-digital scholarship? and why should you care?

in-class viewing

in-class doing:

  • blogs as portfolio (examples)
  • considering your own domain (Dreamhost?)
  • creating a blog (why WordPress?)
  • discuss web-search assignment

homework:

  1. finish creating your blog and choose a template that meets your rhetorical needs
  2. by Wednesday at 8am, post a comment to the class syllabus page discussing your response to the course goals, projects, what you expected, what you value as a student, what you hope to gain from this class, what ideas you might already have for projects, etc. This post serves as recognition that you have read and understand the course syllabus, and also helps me gauge what you expect from me and this class.
  3. read the Kress piece (linked under Jan 21 header below)
  4. by Wednesday class-time, post to your blog a summary response to your search assignment (search terms “multimodal composition” “digital scholarship” “born-digital scholarship” and summarize the main issues (find at least 3 issues) that your search results + the Kress piece (or additional readings) discuss.

January 21: Histories and Key Issues

Overview of multimodal composition theory within writing studies; what is the role of digital scholarship within multimodal composition?; key issues in the field; and what’s not considered (yet) to be a key issue, and why not? and how might that change?

readings:

advanced/graduate readings:

in class:

  • short lecture: history of rhetoric and composition studies (and how/where does mm comp fit in?)
  • discuss key issues from search results (interests? boredoms? what’s left out?)
  • how do key issues relate to “disciplinary conversations” [examples from last semester]
  • start on key-issues multimodal assignment (word, audio, video)
  • equipment overview and hand-out

homework:

  • add all the blogs listed under my Blogroll to your own blog (found under the Links section)
  • complete the “not-found” key issues assignment (see blog)
  • find one academic and one non-academic text and post to your blog (see my blog for more info)

January 28: Key Issues and Canons

more depth into the key issues in multimodal composition, including an overview of terms (and what I mean when I use them vs. what other people mean historically when they use them); a look at what it would mean to form a canon of digital media

readings: your choice based on last-week’s assignments

in-class:

  • review of last week (issues and disciplinary conversations)
  • short history of new media in English studies, w/a focus on writing studies
  • what is “multimodal composition” in relation to this history? what do the terms mean?
  • examining your canonical text-choices in relation to disciplinary identity
  • how-to’s: finding more articles, writing analyses, and taking/embedding screenshots

homework: complete the key-issue (screenshot) analysis


February 4: CFPs, Audience, Kairos, and Technologies

how do modes of communication work in different media? what does a Call for Paper (CFP) do? what audiences within the discipline(s) do CFPs reach? learning some technologies to accomplish multimodal production.

in class:

homework:

  • reflective blog post (due by 8am Saturday): review the goals of the analysis (screenshot) assignment and tell me what you learned from doing this assignment (the meta, as related to the goals) and what you still need to do/learn to revise the analysis. I will read your v.1 analysis based on this blog post.
  • complete the 1-minute video CFP for the Kairos special issue on undergraduate scholars (see Assignments page)


February 11: Kairos, Disciplinary Conversations, and Audience

due: 1-minute video CFP assets

read for today:

advanced/optional readings:

in class:

  • Moviemaker/iMovie tutorial
  • webvpn and student server handouts
  • work on CFPs
  • workshop CFP drafts

homework: revise CFPs, have uploaded to blog by beginning of next class

February 18: Focusing Your Research Project

due today: revised CFPs, uploaded to blogs

read for today:

  • read my feedback of your analyses (available by Tuesday noon)
  • Miles et al, “Violence of Text” (online; intro + 6 web sections)
  • Ball, “Show, Not Tell” (pdf; only need to read Sections 4 and 5)

in-class:

  • revisiting audience(s) of and values for projects
  • discussion of form/content and scholarly possibilities
  • review analysis feedback to refine project ideas
  • discuss pitch proposal assignment (watch an example)
  • how does pitch proposal relate to the textual/video CFPs?

homework:

  • revise analysis using a theoretical framework
  • complete pitch proposal (see Assignments page)
  • post your CFP to 5 friends and respond to their comments (see blog post)
  • update your blogroll


February 25: Pitching Your Project

due today:

  • revised analysis
  • individual project pitch proposal (see Assignments page)

read for today:

in class:

  • listen to and discuss pitch proposals
  • choose groups (voting)
  • review pre- and post-production roles & choose group roles

homework: complete first draft of storyboard

March 4: Peer-Review in Digital Scholarship & Planning/Researching Your Text

understanding what reviewers of a journal (as another audience for your project) will be looking for, and how these items relate to your own values of digital media projects. How does knowing what they’re looking for (if it’s even concretizeable) help you as you compose your project? How DO you begin to compose your project?

read for today:

in class:

  • discuss peer review in digital media using above reading heuristics (i.e., what to expect in digital scholarship)
  • review storyboards
  • collaboration: how will each group member use their strengths and abilities to complete this project?
  • what do you need to know to move forward?

homework:

  • begin digital asset data collection
  • revise CFP for distribution (due by 5pm this Friday)

++++++++++++++

SPRING BREAK

++++++++++++++

March 18: Fair Use/Copyright/Ethics

read for today:

advanced/optional readings:

in class:

  • discussion of readings & data collection/use
  • permissions

March 25: IRB, Ethics, and Design

reviewing data collection so far; what else do you need to collect? how do the parts fit together so far? what role does IRB play in your research project? and, finally, how do you design that project so it looks good!

readings:

in-class

  • discuss applying for IRB approval, ethical issues in presenting data
  • exercise: applying static design principles to your projects

April 1: large-scale edits

April 8: small-scale edits

April 15: accessibility & peer-review writing

discuss making your text accessible, writing a peer-review letter, and finishing small-scale edits

read:

in class:

  • walk through original RiceBall piece
  • discuss peer-review letters (in revised RiceBall piece, under Remote>Special Features>Reviews: Editorial Review 1 and 2)
  • talk about how to choose how to revise based on letters (blog post homework assignment)
  • walk through proposal assignment (see Assignments page)
  • review CFP call (online)
  • show example from Watson CFP
  • discuss making your projects accessible to multiple reader-types

homework:

  • based on the RiceBall editorial review letters, explain how you would revise the piece and post as a blog response
  • complete final draft of your project, including a complete read-through (“proofing”), and have ready by beginning of class for peer-review

April 22: workshop

(beta-test) final projects

in class:

  • workshop classmates’ projects using peer-review heuristic
  • compose individual peer-review letters and email to entire group, copying me, by Friday night

homework:

  • have a group draft of your CFP proposal done and ready for workshop in next class
  • write on your blog how you plan to revise your group project based on the feedback (each person writes an individual post; then compare notes)

April 29: portfolio and class wrap-up

  • give Cheryl your project URLs so she can review them by Friday
  • workshop project proposals
  • discuss revision section in project proposals
  • review portfolio and reflection assignment (see Assignments page); show examples from last semester
  • what’s due when/where/how
  • how to get editable copies of MovieMaker files (see handout on Resources page)
  • discussion of learning outcomes (related to above)
  • class wrap-up
  • evaluations

May 6: Exam period, 1-4pm

  • completed portfolio due
  • there will be cake!

ADDITIONAL (unassigned) READINGS

  • Selfe’s “The Movement of Air” (pdf)
  • Fortune’s, “You’re not in Kansas anymore”: Interactions among semiotic modes in multimodal texts” (pdf)
  • Halbritter’s “Musical Rhetoric in Integrated Media” (pdf)
  • Ball & Moeller’s reading of Watkins’ “Words are the Ultimate Abstraction” (1 pg + 10-minute video)
  • Ira Glass’s Storytelling #3
  • On the Media’s “Pulling Back the Curtain” (podcast or 1-2pp transcript; requires Real Audio)